Why I'm Running

My first impression of politicians came when I was about 12 years old.  Catching glimpses of debates on TV, I usually had little idea of what they were actually talking about, but I could nevertheless appreciate how our Congressmen and candidates always seemed so smart, civil, polished, and statesmanlike. Even factoring in my youthful naïveté, there was something far more sophisticated about politics in the 80s and 90s.

  Parties served as touchstones for common principles, not as rigid religious dogmas.  Everybody tried their best to make salient and logical arguments.  And even though there were disagreements, there was respect demonstrated between even the most bitter of political rivals.



 

Politics have since grown brutish, cultish, stubborn, and uncivil.  Politicians have gotten so wrapped up in the stature of their office that they have forgotten that their job is to represent the people.  An overwhelming majority of America ironically agrees on a lot of important issues and yet nothing ever gets done because legislation gets stymied by congressmen and senators who think they know better.  

What we need is representatives that listen to the people, be good facilitators of discussion on our country's problems, brainstorm, delegate, and give the tools and resources necessary to the professionals --our scientists, engineers, doctors, economists -- that can help solve them.

 

A good representative and a good leader needs to trust his constituents, trust the American system, and leave personal ego out of the legislative process. They have to bring genuine heart, empathy, principle, and human decency to the role of a public servant. I've done that in every other venture I've embarked upon.  I'm confident I can bring those traits with me to Congress and hopefully inspire others to do the same.

 

 

The other reason I’m running is because I believe Orange County is far more progressive than our reputation would suggest  (and despite the bad press we've been getting lately). 

We have a diverse population filled with people from both the working class and the incredibly wealthy. We have great people from all economic classes that believe in taking care of one another.
  We believe in protecting of our environment, we believe in people having access to healthcare, and we believe in fair pay for honest work.  And we want to vote for these things, regardless of the party or person that brings it to them.  Unfortunately for the last two election cycles, they were never personified on the ballot.  

 

That's why I'm running.  Because progress deserves to be on the ballot.


For even more detail on my decision to run, click below to see my e-mail announcement sent to my referees, friends, and family:

My first impression of politicians came when I was about 12 years old.  Catching glimpses of debates on TV, I usually had little idea of what they were actually talking about, but I could nevertheless appreciate how our Congressmen and candidates always seemed so smart, civil, polished, and statesmanlike.  Even factoring in my youthful naïveté, there was something far more sophisticated about politics in the 80s and 90s.

  Parties served as touchstones for common principles, not as rigid religious dogmas.  Everybody tried their best to make salient and logical arguments.  And even though there were disagreements, there was respect demonstrated between even the most bitter of political rivals.



Politics have since grown brutish, cultish, stubborn, and uncivil.  Politicians have gotten so wrapped up in the stature of their office that they have forgotten that their job is to represent the people.  An overwhelming majority of America ironically agrees on a lot of important issues and yet nothing ever gets done because legislation gets stymied by congressmen and senators who think they know better.  

What we need is representatives that listen to the people, be good facilitators of discussion on our country's problems, brainstorm, delegate, and give the tools and resources necessary to the professionals --our scientists, engineers, doctors, economists -- that can help solve them.